When tugging data from the MySQL database onto an internet page, all ellipsis's(...) within the data are displayed having a � in opera or perhaps a square box in IE7.

Has anybody ever experienced this issue before?

Thanks.

update 1: I simply transformed the initial ellipsis '…' with '...' (three dots) and today it really works? Any idea what this may be?

You're most likely tugging UTF-8 data out of your database to some website with ISO (or any other) encoding.

What's the encoding inside your database and what's the header encoding for the html?

This is actually an encoding problem but rather than looking to get around that, It is best to make use of the more correct approach of encoding ellipses as `&hellip' HTML entity.

Alternately, you can test drive it by selecting View > Character Encoding > in Opera or similar in IE. Probably you'll finish up needing to add:

<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/>

or

<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"/>

It is dependent around the character group of your db

you can always replace all of them with &hellip

I simply transformed the initial ellipsis '…' with '...' (three dots) and today it really works?

That's most likely want for you to do anyway. The smoothness U+2026 HORIZONTAL ELLIPSIS is really a ‘compatibility’ character, incorporated to assist round-stumbling between Unicode and old character sets for example Home windows cp1252 (European code page) in which the ellipsis is available like a character on its own.

(The concept is the fact that on modern systems, you simply use three dots when the font really wants to result in the spacing different within an ellipsis — most don't — they can offer a car-ligature when ever three dots are typed.)

all ellipsis's

ellipses :-)

within the data are displayed having a � in opera or perhaps a square box in IE7.

Most likely all of your other non-ASCII figures are similarly affected you might see similar results when ‘smart quotes’ or díäçritical marks are utilized.

Probably your database has figures saved as Home windows cp1252 bytes, however the final web site you are spitting them out into is UTF-8 (either automatically or because of it deliberately set this way).

You should check this by visiting the browser's View->Encoding menu and choosing ‘Western European’ (1252) rather than ‘UTF-8’. Although you could fix this by altering the encoding of the site being created to cp1252, it might be easier to alter the items in the database to ensure that everything was UTF-8 then all Unicode figures could be functional inside your application.

Quite the way you do that would rely on what language/platform you are using.