My opportunity lately made the decision to show their contract web design project (they finally introduced the website internally) in a full-time position. Being an established worker I've first crack in an interview. I have been deveoping in a semi-professional (some light become a freelancer and growth and development of web aps for my opportunity) level for some time now, but never really used a Content management systems.

Joomla appears to become a dependence on this project, and so i have two several weeks before the position is formally open. Where will i start?

Is dependent around the depth you need to know. Joomla relies round the PHP/MySQL language which takes a fair quantity of understanding. Without having an awareness of those languages you might really struggle.

The Joomla coding is rather easy with extensions being split up into numerous groups (templates, components, plug ins, modules, languages). When considering the backdrop of Joomla take a look in to the procedural calls which are made on each event ie. onAfterRender. These occasions would be the toughest a part of Joomla.

Otherwise the http://forum.joomla.org website is quite comprehensive along with the sites pointed out above.

Best of luck!

Personally, the easiest method to learn something is to get it done, and Joomla is fairly simple to have fun with, so choose a target architecture (options really are a Linux Light dev box, a Home windows + Apache + PHP + MySQL box or perhaps a webhost that provides Joomla support) and begin playing. Unless of course you've got a valid reason I'd stick to Linux Light. Build a method and begin playing. Consider functionality that could be needed and discover what it is done, then give it a try. Stuff that spring to mind could be

  • Search engine optimization Optimisation (meta data marking, Sitemaps, search, URL re-writing etc)
  • Image hosting and connecting
  • Discussion Forum integration
  • Calendar integration
  • Different Templates
  • Mobile Phone Support

Remember see one, do one, train one !

Regards,

Paul.