Does enabling the configuration option with-config-file-scan-dir when producing PHP result in performance issues?

Particularly, performs this tell the PHP binary to perform a file system scan each time the PHP module is loaded to reply to a request?

I imagine it will, which getting multiple ini files causes somewhat more disk access on every request. I guess this may be mitigated by placing all individuals separate directives in to the same php.ini file.

Can anybody confirm or deny this?

Bryan,

The CLI/(Fast)CGI versions do load the .ini files every time they're thrilled however, the apache module loads them once into memory once the server is began. You can look at this behavior by altering something most of the .ini files and running the CLI binary. Notice that you'll require a server restart before you begin to see the alterations in the server module version.

No, Basically comprehend it properly you'll provide it a directory that when the PHP config is loaded (at apache startup) PHP will read every file within the directory like a config file.

Some info here and much more here (better link)

Performs this tell the PHP binary to perform a file system scan each time the PHP module is loaded to reply to a request?

No. Whenever you compile --with-config-file-scan-dir=/path/to/dir all you are doing is telling PHP mix all files within this directory into its configuration. This can be a method frequently utilized in system configuration where package management systems have to have the ability to add/remove package specific configuration from a credit card applicatoin without potentially wrecking a finish-user modified config file. A good example here could be, on the Debian based system, whenever you apt-get install php-pgsql, it'll produce a /etc/php/conf.d/pgsql.ini that will retain the extension=pgsql.so line, in addition to any module-specific options.

Does enabling the configuration option with-config-file-scan-dir when producing PHP result in performance issues?

Not necessarily. Used, it's just a concatenation of all of the .ini files for the reason that particular directory.

I will tell you that Debian, CentOS, and Zend Server all make use of this option automatically.

Also, just off the top my mind, *nix RC files, Apache2, Courier, Emacs, and Cron all use (or may use) similar methods to loading designs.