I usually attempted to understand using the newest versions of SQL Server, books, articles, paperwork.

I began to doubt whether it's efficient. I have got a sense that i'm frequently inefficiently losing time with learning materials according to bloated AdventureWorksXXX sample databases from SQL Server 2005+.
Even easiest concepts and ideas are blurred with unwieldy query good examples, results, tables, data, schemes, relations, etc. in

Perhaps it would be easier to self-study database design on a lot more small , observable SQL Server 2000 (Pub, Northwind) sample databases, articles, books, on-line courses?
What shall I loose with this particular approach?
Do you know the variations in database design between SQL Server 2000 and 2008 R2 to keep yourself informed?

Update:
I didn't mean setting up SQL Server 2000 but getting Pubs+Northwind on SQL Server 2008R2 additionally to new sample databases.
Update2: always getting all them set up in Home windows 2008R2. This isn't question how you can install sample databases.

Do you know the variations in database design between SQL Server 2000 and 2008 R2 to keep yourself informed?

All the versions since 2000 has introduced us significant new abilities, for example:

SQL Server 2005

  • XML datatype and all sorts of its support features
  • Support for SQL-CLR (.Internet runtime baked into SQL Server)
  • Common Table Expression (CTE) support
  • new datatypes VARCHAR(MAX), NVARCHAR(MAX), VARBINARY(MAX)
  • TRY / CATCH based error handling

SQL Server 2008

  • new DATE, DATETIME2 etc. data types
  • support for such things as FILESTREAM and HierarchyId
  • the brand new MERGE statement
  • table-valued parameters for saved methods

plus most likely a number of more.

A number of individuals possess a significant effect on you skill having a database, and therefore how you should design your database, too.

So returning to SQL Server 2000 and pubs may be okay - but you will be passing up on lots of more recent features and just how they are able to make dev existence a great deal simpler over time. The fundamentals of objects like tables, indices, sights, saved procs and funcs etc. are virtually exactly the same between SQL Server versions 2000, 2005, 2008 and 2008 R2 (aside from the SQL-CLR programmability options in 2005+, clearly).