The very first time, I'm writing an internet service which will make use of exterior programs to process demands in batch. The leading-finish need file uploads after which place these questions queue. The employees around the after sales will require that file, run it through ffmpeg and also the relaxation of my pipeline, and send a contact when the operation is complete.

I've my after sales process focusing on my computer (Ubuntu 10.04). Now you ask ,: must i attempt to re-create that pipeline using binaries that I have put together on your own? Or perhaps is it okay to make use of apt when setting up within the Real Life?

Not every hosts uses Ubuntu, and never all produce root access. (I've not selected a number yet.) However, they'll allow me to upload binaries to complete, and several produce spend access with gcc.

Usually this is a no-brainier and I'd compile everything on your own. But doing this - as well as trying to puzzle out how to produce a platform-independent .tar.gz binary - is going to be a significant task which ultimately does not help much me ship my product.

Have you got any ideas on the easiest method to setup my stack to ensure that I am not associated with a particular host company? Must I try creating my very own .n, which consists of Ubuntu's version of ffmpeg (along with other tools) using the designs I want?

Lacking a setup where I manage my very own servers/VMs (which might actually be what I must do), how might I make this happen?

Now you ask ,: must i attempt to re-create that pipeline using binaries that I have put together on your own? Or perhaps is it okay to make use of apt when setting up within the Real Life?

It's backwards: it's not okay to deploy unpackaged within the Real Life IMHO

and never all produce root access

How does one be implementing b .n without root access. Chroot jails?

But doing this - as well as trying to puzzle out how to produce a platform-independent .tar.gz binary - is going to be a significant task which ultimately does not help much me ship my product.

+1 You answer you have question. Don't meddle unless of course you need to.

Have you got any ideas on the easiest method to setup my stack to ensure that I am not associated with a particular host company?

Only rely on wellpackaged standard libs (for example ffmpeg). Otherwise include them in your deployment. This issue is not way too hard too solve for 10s of 1000 Linux programs over decades now, therefore it would most likely be achievable for you personally too.


As they are:

Take a look at rightscale along with other cloud companies/agents which have specialized images/tool chains specifically for video encoding.

A 'regular' VPS provider (with Xen or Virtuozzo) won't normally be pleased with most of these workload, but EC2, Rackspace as well as their lot is going to be absolutely fine with this. Generally, I wouldn't think that a cloud infrastructure provider that does not grant root access will permit computationally intensive workloads. $.02