I've not had the opportunity to completely hold the variations. Are you able to describe both concepts and employ real life good examples?

  • An determining relationship happens when the presence of a row inside a child table is dependent on the row inside a parent table. This might be confusing since it is common practice nowadays to produce a pseudokey for a kid table, but not result in the foreign answer to parents area of the child's primary key. Formally, the "right" method of doing this really is to create the foreign key area of the child's primary key. However the logical relationship would be that the child cannot exist with no parent.

    Example: A Person has a number of telephone numbers. When they had only one telephone number, we're able to simply store it inside a column of Person. Since you want to support multiple telephone numbers, we create a second table PhoneNumbers, whose primary key includes the person_id referencing the Person table.

    We might think about the telephone number(s) as belonging to someone, despite the fact that they're patterned as characteristics of the separate table. This can be a strong clue that it is really an determining relationship (even when we do not literally include person_id however key of PhoneNumbers).

  • A non-determining relationship happens when the main key characteristics from the parent mustn't become primary key characteristics from the child. Among this can be a research table, like a foreign key on Person.condition referencing the main key of States.condition. Person is really a child table regarding States. But a row in Person isn't recognized by its condition attribute. I.e. condition isn't area of the primary key of Person.

    A non-determining relationship could be optional or mandatory, meaning the foreign key column enables NULL or disallows NULL, correspondingly.

There's another explatation in the real life:

A magazine goes for an owner, as well as an owner can own multiple books. However the book can exist also with no owner also it can alter the owner. The connection from a book as well as an owner is really a non determining relationship.

A magazine however is compiled by a writer, and also the author might have written multiple books. However the book must be compiled by a writer it can't exist with no author. And so the relationship between your book and also the author is definitely an determining relationship.

An Determining relationship identifies that the child object cannot exist with no parent object

Non-determining associations identifies a normal association between objects, 1:1 or 1:n cardinality.

Non-determining associations could be specified as optional in which a parent isn't needed or mandatory in which a parent is needed by setting the parent table cardinality...

Here is a good description:

Associations between two organizations might be classified to be either "determining" or "non-determining". Determining associations exist once the primary key from the parent entity is incorporated however key from the child entity. However, a non-determining relationship is available once the primary key from the parent entity is incorporated within the child entity although not included in the child entity's primary key. Additionally, non-determining associations might be further classified to be either "mandatory" or "non-mandatory". An important non-determining relationship is available once the value within the child table can't be null. However, a non-mandatory non-determining relationship is available once the value within the child table could be null.

http://world wide web.sqlteam.com/article/database-design-and-modeling-basic principles

Here is a simple illustration of an determining relationship:

Parent

------

ID (PK)

Title

Child

-----

ID (PK)

ParentID (PK, FK to Parent.ID) -- notice PK

Title

Here is a corresponding non-determining relationship:

Parent

------

ID (PK)

Title

Child

-----

ID (PK)

ParentID (FK to Parent.ID) -- notice no PK

Title