I've heard both of these terms "temporary table" and "global temporary table" used virtually in similar context.

What's the distinction between the 2?

In Oracle there is not any difference. Whenever you produce a temporary table within an Oracle database, it's instantly global, and you're simply needed to incorporate the "Global" key phrase.

The SQL standard, which defines the way the term "GLOBAL TEMPORARY TABLE" is construed, enables for whether LOCAL or GLOBAL scope. This could permit whether user specific table (LOCAL) or everybody (GLOBAL). Oracle implements just the GLOBAL version.

The information you place into an Oracle Temporary table is specific for your session. That's, solve these questions . call at your data even when you will find 100 customers all utilizing the same table, as well as your information is erased in the table whenever you disconnect (or whenever you commit the present transaction) based upon table configurations.

Contrast this with MS SQL-Server, where temporary tables are local. Should you create one, nobody besides you recognizes that your temporary table is available. In Oracle, creating the temporary table enables everybody (well everybody with use of your schema) to determine the table. Whenever you log from your session, the SQL-Server table is erased and will have to be recreated for the following session. In Oracle, the temporary table has become a lasting a part of your schema, even when the information is not.

Remember that a worldwide temporary table doesn't have statistics connected by using it, so consider if the dynamic sampling level for that instance ought to be set to make sure that unanalyzed tables are tried at parse time. Otherwise the heuristics can result in an awful execution plan.

Furthermore, Oracle (global) temp tables are very helpful when all of your customers/periods have to each visit a different group of data. Just Place the records for your global temp table and let Oracle manage keeping one user's set from another's, along with the cleanup. You don't have to query all of them with anyone's ID, a session id or whatever.

We discover them very handy.

Nice to understand: It's possible to create indexes on global temporary tables in Oracle.

Contrast this with MS SQL-Server, where temporary tables are local. Should you create one, nobody besides you recognizes that your temporary table is available. In Oracle, creating the temporary table enables everybody (well everybody with use of your schema) to determine the table. Whenever you log from your session, the SQL-Server table is erased and will have to be recreated for the following session. In Oracle, the temporary table has become a lasting a part of your schema, even when the information is not (otherwise so that you can decide whether or not to preserve it). The Oracle supports only global temporary table helps you save from needing to produce the table in every session it 'exists' but it's empty, and it is submissions are unique (and) per session.